A Cookbook Filled with Family Favorites and Age-Old Classics.

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I spent 30+ years in a cubicle, programming computers.  Late in my career, I began to notice that nobody cooked much anymore.  Everybody works now days and there’s so much to do after work that it’s just easier to head for fast food on the way home. These realizations inspired me to start writing down my family recipes.  Six years later, I had prepared and written up over 600 recipes that I had been collecting from family and friends over my lifetime.  All this cooking and typing made me want to encourage others to cook more or learn to cook and save all their family recipes, too.  I was inspired to learn more about the basic ingredients my family used and share that knowledge with my readers to help them feel more confident on their cooking journey.  And now Caveman Chemistry is ready for you.  Purchase my cookbook on http://www.lulu.com.  I know you will enjoy preparing and eating my family’s favorite dishes.

Valerie and Her First Book

Valerie and Her First Book

It’s All About the Filling. A Rant.

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So, here’s my question.  Is filling so much more expensive than the pastry that we have to accept less and less filling in our twinkies, cupcakes, and donuts?  Isn’t it the filling that makes these pastries better than the average sponge cake?  I want my filling back.  Do you hear that, cake and donut manufacturers?  I want more filling!  And it seems to me you can give me what I want and still make money.  In fact, don’t you make more money by satisfying your customers?  Meanwhile, I have decided to make my own cream-filled donuts.  And I’m sharing my recipe for those who agree with me and don’t mind a little extra work to get what they want.

Boston Cream Donuts

  • 2 – 16.3 ounce tubes Grands Flaky Layers
  • 2 – 3.4 ounce boxes instant vanilla pudding mix
  • 3 – cups milk
  • 1 – tablespoon vanilla, optional
  • 2 – 1 ounce squares semi-sweet chocolate
  • 1/4 cup evaporated milk

Separate the biscuits and fry them in your deep fryer.  If you don’t have a deep fryer, pour at least an inch of vegetable oil in an electric frypan and heat the oil to about 350 to turn the biscuits into donuts.  Cool the donuts to room temperature.

Beat the pudding mix with the milk and vanilla, until the pudding is thick.  Pour the pudding into a gallon ziplock bag and cut off one corner of the bag to make a small hole for piping the pudding.  Open one side of each donut and pipe the pudding inside the donut.  Be generous, we’re doing this because we want more filling.  Refrigerate the donuts to stiffen the pudding.

Put the chocolate and evaporated milk in a small bowl and microwave for about 1 minute, just long enough to soften the chocolate.  Stir the chocolate and milk until well blended and let it cool a little.  Dip the top of each donut in the chocolate and put the donuts back in the fridge.  Or eat right away.  Your choice.

If you just want a quick donut fix, forget the filling and roll the donuts in powdered sugar as soon as you take them out of the oil.  Yum, warm sugary donuts!  Cinnamon and granulated sugar make a good donut, too.